Review: Volume 8 - Medieval History

Review: Volume 8 - Medieval History


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Offering a fresh interpretation of power structures and political patterns in late Anglo-Saxon England, this book focuses on the family of Ealdorman Leofwine, which obtained power in Mercia, and retained it throughout an extraordinary period of political upheaval between 994 and 1071. The house of Leofwine survived events such as the Viking wars, a palace revolution in 1006-7, and further rounds of political bloodletting during the reign of Æthelred 'the Unready'. It maintained power through Cnut's conquest of 1016, the explosive factional politics of Edward the Confessor's reign, the battles of 1066, and even the first few years of William the Conqueror's reign. Stephen Baxter examines why this family retained power for so long, and why it eventually fell. Offering the first extended treatment of the nature and limits of earls' power, The Earls of Mercia is a reappraisal of the structure of land tenure and the mechanics of royal patronage, and provides a new perspective from which to explore how noble families used religious patronage to strengthen local power structures. Reconstructing pre-Conquest lordship using Domesday evidence, it is the first sustained attempt to explore the relationship between local and national politics,

offering a major new interpretation of the whole structure of the early English kingdom on the eve of its demise.


Medieval History-Based Writing Lessons Teacher Book

"Bargain Books" are brand new items that have minor physical blemishes due to shipping or handling that do not affect the use of the item. All Bargain Books are sold as is and all sales are final (no returns, exchanges or cancellations). Bargain books will remain in shopping cart for up to 12 hours and will then be removed if order is not completed. Orders consisting of regular and Bargain items can be purchased by credit card or PayPal and are shipped together (with two packing slips).

This item is a digital download file and is not a printed or physical product. Upon completion of checkout, you will receive an email with a link for you to download the file and save to your local device. Please note that ebooks and other digital media downloads are not returnable and all sales are final.

Product Description:

The teacher component of the Medieval History Based Writing Lessons course, this resource contains teaching information, reduced format student pages, games, quizzes and answer keys. Please note that this is also sold in a Student & Teacher Set.

Publisher Description:

Knights, Vikings, kings, and famous men of the Middle Ages come to life as students learn to write with Structure and Style.

From the Anglo-Saxons to the Renaissance, from chivalrous knights to Genghis Khan, students will improve their knowledge of medieval times while learning to write with Structure and Style.

This Teachers Manual includes the student pages inset, as well as teaching tips, sample whiteboards, games, vocabulary quizzes, and answer keys.

This book is designed to be used by an instructor who has been through or is currently viewing the Teaching Writing: Structure and Style video course.

We also carry this Teacher's Manual together with the Student Book.

This theme-based writing curriculum offers a full year of instruction for students in grades 68 and is perfect for homeschoolers, homeschool co-ops, tutors, and hybrid schools.

Note: The Student Resource Packet is a necessary component of this course. This supplemental resource is included with your purchase as an e-book for you to download and print.

Lessons featuring medieval history themes including: Charlemagne, the Vikings, Genghis Khan, knighthood, men of the Reinaissance and more incrementally teach all the IEW models of structure and elements of style. Fifth edition (new for 2019).

Based on specific topics or on events in history, these sets of writing lessons (same grade-range levels as the SSS) offer comprehensive, almost scripted instruction. All necessary source texts have been developed for busy parents and teachers like you. An IEW veteran and aficionado myself, I couldn't conceive of anything more complete than what is provided here. Each lesson offers comprehensive (just short of totally scripted) instruction. All necessary source texts are provided and are reproducible for one parent/one homeschool or one teacher/one classroom. Successful brainstorming is ensured by the inclusion of sample class whiteboards. Clear assignments (sometimes differentiated between levels) along with a checklist to aid both the student in preparation and the parent in grading are reproducible and designed to be handed to the student to work on throughout the week. Based on specific topics or events in various segments of history, the lessons include grammar exercises, vocabulary development, quizzes, and games for review and reinforcement - along with the writing instruction, of course.

In all lessons students are encouraged to polish their final draft perhaps even adding illustrations. At the end of each course the student will have a personal portfolio collection of poems, stories, reports, essays and research papers. Lessons are taught at the beginning of each week allowing the rest of the week for students to complete the assignment which they should be able to do on their own. Teacher preparation is minimal. (Do I hear an emphatic "Yes!"?)

The courses are targeting a progressively more competent student with the assumption that students are working through the courses according to suggested grade levels. Therefore, there is an increasing complexity to the instructions, expectations, and assignments. Accordingly, teachers are encouraged to be flexible with plans. The beginning writer may need to spend more than the suggested week on difficult lessons or omit some of the grammar. Mature students may move more quickly to allow time for additional research writing and/or more creative essay writing.

Many of these courses can be used equally well within a homeschool with several different aged students and all can be used in a co-op/support school setting with more grade-specific groupings of students. It's assumed that parents/teachers have completed Teaching Writing Structure & Style (TWSS), IEW's DVD seminar for parents and teachers. Students who are familiar with IEW's writing method through the Structure and Style for Students (SSS) courses (or the older Student Writing Intensive (SWI) seminars) could probably start with any volume of this series, but it's strongly recommended that students complete US Vol. 1 before US Vol. 2.

For some courses each student will need the Student Resource Notebook which is to be assembled into a 1/2" three-ring binder on the first day of class and includes the following: a chart of IEW Stylistic Techniques IEW Models of Structure mini-thesaurus of great verbs, adjectives, and adverbs IEW decorations with practice worksheets grammar rules with practice worksheets list of transition words and phrases and other class handouts. This Student Resource Notebook is available either as a complimentary e-book (downloadable from the IEW website) or in a spiral-bound print version (#54172) that is a separate purchase.

Some courses have both a Teacher and a Student Book. In these courses, instruction for the teacher is more extensive and both books are necessary as the course is designed to be interactive between the teacher and student. Other courses have a single book where instruction is written to the students. Teachers should plan to read over the lessons with the students and help as necessary, especially with outlining and brainstorming. The teacher will need access to a copier (or printer) for student handouts, a large whiteboard, and dry erase markers. A roll of tickets (available at office supply stores) is optional but very useful for encouragement and motivation. Students will need a 1/2" three-ring binder with eight divider tabs (for student resource packet), a 1" three-ring binder with five divider tabs, and access to a thesaurus (preference is Synonym Finder, but you can use an electronic version.)


Medieval History-Based Writing Lessons Teacher & Student Set

"Bargain Books" are brand new items that have minor physical blemishes due to shipping or handling that do not affect the use of the item. All Bargain Books are sold as is and all sales are final (no returns, exchanges or cancellations). Bargain books will remain in shopping cart for up to 12 hours and will then be removed if order is not completed. Orders consisting of regular and Bargain items can be purchased by credit card or PayPal and are shipped together (with two packing slips).

This item is a digital download file and is not a printed or physical product. Upon completion of checkout, you will receive an email with a link for you to download the file and save to your local device. Please note that ebooks and other digital media downloads are not returnable and all sales are final.

Product Description:

Lessons featuring Medieval History themes including knights, Vikings, Mohammed, Charlemagne, Battle of Hastings, King Arthur, Genghis Khan, and Men of the Reinaissance among others incrementally teach all the IEW models of structure and elements of style. Vocabulary cards, quizzes, and games are included. 30 lessons, 5th Ed. - made up of a teacher/student set with the student book also available separately.

Publisher Description:

Knights, Vikings, kings, and famous men of the Middle Ages come to life as students learn to write with Structure and Style.

From the Anglo-Saxons to the Renaissance, from chivalrous knights to Genghis Khan, students will improve their knowledge of medieval times while learning to write with Structure and Style.

This theme-based writing curriculum offers a full year of instruction for students in grades 6 to 8 and is perfect for homeschoolers, homeschool co-ops, tutors, and hybrid schools. Working through all of IEW's Units 19, students learn to take notes, retell narrative stories, summarize references, write from pictures, compose essays, and more. Includes vocabulary cards, literature suggestions, and access to helpful PDF downloads.

This book is designed to be used by an instructor who has been through or is currently viewing the Teaching Writing: Structure and Style video course.

Note: The Student Resource Packet is a necessary component of this course. This supplemental resource is included with your purchase as an e-book for you to download and print.

Lessons featuring medieval history themes including: Charlemagne, the Vikings, Genghis Khan, knighthood, men of the Reinaissance and more incrementally teach all the IEW models of structure and elements of style. Fifth edition (new for 2019).

Based on specific topics or on events in history, these sets of writing lessons (same grade-range levels as the SSS) offer comprehensive, almost scripted instruction. All necessary source texts have been developed for busy parents and teachers like you. An IEW veteran and aficionado myself, I couldn't conceive of anything more complete than what is provided here. Each lesson offers comprehensive (just short of totally scripted) instruction. All necessary source texts are provided and are reproducible for one parent/one homeschool or one teacher/one classroom. Successful brainstorming is ensured by the inclusion of sample class whiteboards. Clear assignments (sometimes differentiated between levels) along with a checklist to aid both the student in preparation and the parent in grading are reproducible and designed to be handed to the student to work on throughout the week. Based on specific topics or events in various segments of history, the lessons include grammar exercises, vocabulary development, quizzes, and games for review and reinforcement - along with the writing instruction, of course.

In all lessons students are encouraged to polish their final draft perhaps even adding illustrations. At the end of each course the student will have a personal portfolio collection of poems, stories, reports, essays and research papers. Lessons are taught at the beginning of each week allowing the rest of the week for students to complete the assignment which they should be able to do on their own. Teacher preparation is minimal. (Do I hear an emphatic "Yes!"?)

The courses are targeting a progressively more competent student with the assumption that students are working through the courses according to suggested grade levels. Therefore, there is an increasing complexity to the instructions, expectations, and assignments. Accordingly, teachers are encouraged to be flexible with plans. The beginning writer may need to spend more than the suggested week on difficult lessons or omit some of the grammar. Mature students may move more quickly to allow time for additional research writing and/or more creative essay writing.

Many of these courses can be used equally well within a homeschool with several different aged students and all can be used in a co-op/support school setting with more grade-specific groupings of students. It's assumed that parents/teachers have completed Teaching Writing Structure & Style (TWSS), IEW's DVD seminar for parents and teachers. Students who are familiar with IEW's writing method through the Structure and Style for Students (SSS) courses (or the older Student Writing Intensive (SWI) seminars) could probably start with any volume of this series, but it's strongly recommended that students complete US Vol. 1 before US Vol. 2.

For some courses each student will need the Student Resource Notebook which is to be assembled into a 1/2" three-ring binder on the first day of class and includes the following: a chart of IEW Stylistic Techniques IEW Models of Structure mini-thesaurus of great verbs, adjectives, and adverbs IEW decorations with practice worksheets grammar rules with practice worksheets list of transition words and phrases and other class handouts. This Student Resource Notebook is available either as a complimentary e-book (downloadable from the IEW website) or in a spiral-bound print version (#54172) that is a separate purchase.

Some courses have both a Teacher and a Student Book. In these courses, instruction for the teacher is more extensive and both books are necessary as the course is designed to be interactive between the teacher and student. Other courses have a single book where instruction is written to the students. Teachers should plan to read over the lessons with the students and help as necessary, especially with outlining and brainstorming. The teacher will need access to a copier (or printer) for student handouts, a large whiteboard, and dry erase markers. A roll of tickets (available at office supply stores) is optional but very useful for encouragement and motivation. Students will need a 1/2" three-ring binder with eight divider tabs (for student resource packet), a 1" three-ring binder with five divider tabs, and access to a thesaurus (preference is Synonym Finder, but you can use an electronic version.)


1.8: Medieval Politics

  • Christopher Brooks
  • Full-time faculty (History) at Portland Community College

The feudal system flourished in the High Middle Ages. While it had its origins in the centuries after the collapse of the western Roman Empire, the formal system of vassals pledging loyalty to kings in return for military service (or, increasingly, in return for cash payments in lieu of military service) really came of age in the eleventh and twelfth centuries. The lords themselves presided over a rigidly hierarchical social and political system in which one&rsquos vocation was largely determined by birth, and the vocation of the nobility was clearly defined by landowning and making war.

Lords - meaning land-owning nobles - lived in &ldquomanors,&rdquo a term that denoted not only their actual houses but the lands they owned. All of the peasants on their lands owed them rent, originally in the form of crops but eventually in cash, as well as a certain amount of labor each year. Peasants were subdivided into different categories, including the relatively-well off independent yeomen and freeholders, who owned their own plots of land, down to the serfs, semi-free peasants tied to the land, and then the cottagers, who were the landless peasants worse-off even than serfs. The system of land-ownership and the traditional rights enjoyed by not just lords, but serfs and freeholders who lived under the lords, is referred to as &ldquomanorialism,&rdquo the rural political and economic system of the High Middle Ages as a whole.

One of the traditional rights, and a vital factor in the lives of peasants, were the commons: lands not officially controlled by anyone that all people had a right to use. The commons provided firewood, grazing land, and some limited trapping of small animals, collectively serving as a vital &ldquosafety net&rdquo for peasants living on the edge of subsistence. Access to the commons was not about written laws, but instead the traditional, centuries-old agreements that governed the interactions between different social classes. Eventually, peasants would find their access to the commons curtailed by landowning nobles intent on converting them to cash-producing farms, but for the medieval period itself, the peasants continued to enjoy the right to their use.

The kingdoms of Europe up to this point were barely unified. In many cases, kings were simply the most powerful nobles, men who extracted pledges of loyalty from their subjects but whose actual authority was limited to their personal lands. Likewise, kings in the early Middle Ages were largely itinerant, moving from place to place all year long. They had to make an annual circuit of their kingdoms to ensure that their powerful vassals would stay loyal to them a vassal ignored for too long could, and generally did, simply stop acknowledging the lordship of his king. Those patterns started to change during the High Middle Ages, and the first two kingdoms to show real signs of centralization were France and England.

In France, a series of kings named Philip (I through IV) ruled from 1060 to 1314, building a strong administrative apparatus complete with royal judges who were directly beholden to the crown. The kings ruled the region around Paris (called the Île-de-France, meaning the "island of France"), but their influence went well beyond it as they extended their holdings. Philip IV even managed to seize almost complete control of the French Church, defying papal authority. He also proved incredibly shrewd at creating new taxes and in attacking and seizing the lands and holdings of groups like the French Jewish community and the Knights Templar, both of whom he ransacked (the assault on the Knights Templar started in 1307).

In England, the line descending from William the Conqueror (following his invasion in 1066) was also effective in creating a relatively stable political system. All land was legally the king&rsquos, and his nobles received their lands as &ldquofiefs,&rdquo essentially loans from the crown that had to be renewed for payments on the death of a landholder before it could be inherited. Henry II (r. 1154 &ndash 1189) created a system of royal sheriffs to enforce his will, created circuit courts that traveled around the land hearing cases, and created a grand jury system that allowed people to be tried by their peers.

In 1215, a much less competent king named John signed the Magna Carta (&ldquogreat charter&rdquo) with the English nobility that formally acknowledged the feudal privileges of the nobility, towns and clergy. The important effect of the Magna Carta was its principle: even the king had to respect the law. Thereafter English kings began to call the Parliament, a meeting of the Church, nobles, and well-off commoners, in order to get authorization and money for their wars.


A Charlotte Mason inspired Journey Through World History!

The World's Story 2 guides students in a trip around the world as they study history from the Fall of Rome to the Renaissance.

In The World's Story 2, your student will:

  • See God's guiding hand through history
  • Study the major events of the Middle Ages and delve into how society and culture developed and changed
  • Study Church history of this period
  • Study medieval civilizations spanning the whole globe, including the Byzantines, Anglo-Saxons, Muslims, Chinese, Japanese, Mongols, Mughals, Vikings, Normans, Russians, Songhai, and Aztecs
  • and so much more!

Exciting, interactive stories!

The World's Story 2 brings history alive for students in an exciting way! Through engaging, conversational narrative, O'Dell interacts with students and draws them in to imagine the adventures, hardships, failures, and triumphs of the incredible events and civilizations that shaped Middle-Age world history.


Late Medieval History

Etwa seit dem späten 14. Jahrhundert erscheint in der historiographischen und literarischen Überlieferung Frankreichs und Deutschlands ein neuer Heldentypus: Niederadlige der Gegenwart oder jüngsten Vergangenheit, die in biographischen Lebenszeugnissen zu heroischen Rittern stilisiert wurden.

Dieses Buch zeigt, dass es dabei keineswegs um die Verklärung moribunder Ideale geht. Vielmehr schreiben sich diese Heldenbilder in kontrovers geführte Diskussionen um die Rolle des Adels in der sich wandelnden Gesellschaft des Spätmittelalters ein. Sie stehen für den Anspruch des Adels, mit dem Wandel auf militärischem und sozialem Feld Schritt zu halten, indem sie traditionelle Legitimationsressourcen des Adels wie Rittertum, Fürstendienst und die adlige Familie mobilisieren.

Rezensionen:
- Boris Gübele in: Historische Zeitschrift 2020 (311:2), S. 474-476, https://doi.org/10.1515/hzhz-2020-1371.
- Mark Mersiowsky in: Damals, 28.6.2019, https://www.wissenschaft.de/rezensionen/buecher/verehrte-ritterhelden.
- Uwe Israel in: Francia Rezension 2019 (3), https://doi.org/10.11588/frrec.2019.3.66350.
- David S. Bachrach in German History 2019 (37:4), S. 566–567, https://doi.org/10.1093/gerhis/ghz067.
- Arie van Steensel in: Virtus. Journal of Nobility Sudies 2019 (26), https://doi.org/10.21827/5e021089731e0.
- Gerhard Fouquet in: Zeitschrift für historische Forschung 2020 (47:4), S. 688-690, https://doi.org/10.3790/zhf.47.4.663.

This book explores why Ethiopian kings pursued long-distance diplomatic contacts with Latin Europe in the late Middle Ages. It traces the history of more than a dozen embassies dispatched to the Latin West by the kings of Solomonic Ethiopia, a powerful Christian kingdom in the medieval Horn of Africa. Drawing on sources from Europe, Ethiopia, and Egypt, it examines the Ethiopian kings’ motivations for sending out their missions in the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries – and argues that a desire to acquire religious treasures and foreign artisans drove this early intercontinental diplomacy. Moreover, the Ethiopian initiation of contacts with the distant Christian sphere of Latin Europe appears to have been intimately connected to a local political agenda of building monumental ecclesiastical architecture in the North-East African highlands, and asserted the Ethiopian rulers’ claim of universal kingship and rightful descent from the biblical king Solomon. Shedding new light on the self-identity of a late medieval African dynasty at the height of its power, this book challenges conventional narratives of African-European encounters on the eve of the so-called ‘Age of Exploration'.

Front Matter of the book "Medieval Ethiopian Kingship, Craft, and Diplomacy with Latin Europe", published by Palgrave Macmillan, March 2021.


A Look Inside

A Charlotte Mason inspired Journey Through World History!

The World's Story 2 guides students in a trip around the world as they study history from the Fall of Rome to the Renaissance.

In The World's Story 2, your student will:

  • See God's guiding hand through history
  • Study the major events of the Middle Ages and delve into how society and culture developed and changed
  • Study Church history of this period
  • Study medieval civilizations spanning the whole globe, including the Byzantines, Anglo-Saxons, Muslims, Chinese, Japanese, Mongols, Mughals, Vikings, Normans, Russians, Songhai, and Aztecs
  • and so much more!

Exciting, interactive stories!

The World's Story 2 brings history alive for students in an exciting way! Through engaging, conversational narrative, O'Dell interacts with students and draws them in to imagine the adventures, hardships, failures, and triumphs of the incredible events and civilizations that shaped Middle-Age world history.


Review: Volume 8 - Medieval History - History

The Duties of a Good Knight

This entry was posted on June 23, 2021 by Peter Konieczny .

And I tell you that the first and principal thing is that they should keep the oath which they have made to their lord to whom they belong, and to whom they have sworn and promised to do all that he shall command for the defence of his land, according to what is laid down by the laws.
Read more

The Mongols in Central Europe: The Profile and Impact of their Thirteenth-Century Invasions

This entry was posted on June 9, 2021 by Peter Konieczny .

One of the changes brought about because of the COVID-19 pandemic has been that many in-person meetings have been cancelled, and replaced by virtual gatherings.
Read more

Stupid word or stupid deed?

This entry was posted on May 26, 2021 by Peter Konieczny .

Henry is so upset that he orders the knight to be immediately executed.
Read more

Clonmacnoise and its medieval tower

This entry was posted on May 12, 2021 by Peter Konieczny .

A look at the Ireland's most famous medieval tower, which can be found at Clonmacnoise.
Read more


Department History of Material Culture Middle Ages nad Early Modern Times

This article investigates the question whether testaments and probate inventories could be authenticated and stored by the Cracow vogt. Such a possibility is suggested by a number of registers connected exclusively with the work of this institution and kept by its own chancery (or at least by a special group of clerks). The analysis was based on about fifteen manuscripts including records from the last quarter of the 15th century and the beginning of the 16 century. The registers that were analysed included only one testament, which proves that the vogt’s office was not authorized to authenticate and store last wills. The only case recorded was the testament of Elena, wife to Mikołaj Zeidehaffter, registered in book no. 83 under 18 December 1476, in rather exceptional circumstances. As the testator was dying, her statement of last will was taken down late at night by two magistrates and the deputy vogt Jan Richman. Most probably, it was due to his presence at the act that Ms Zeidehaffter’s last will was entered into acta advocatalia. Jan Richman, as a witness of her will, simply recorded it later in the vogt register that he kept. In the investigated period inventories occured in Cracow vogt registers rather irregularly, in the section devoted to general matters, called processus in historiography. In each of the manuscripts their number fluctuates from a few (in the 1470s) to a dozen or so (at the beginning of the 16th c.), which is less that 0.5% of all the records. Furthermore, some inventories concern the property of living persons. They all share a common form, which indicates that inventorying was done for a particular purpose, only if an application had been made to the vogt office, and that the document was registered only if it was relevant for a particular procedure undertaken by the office. The analysis of the surviving registers form the late Middle Ages indicates that the Cracow vogt office was not responsible for storing and authenticating testaments and probate inventories through their registration. Records of that kind had a different purpose or, as in the case of the single testament, resulted from exceptional circumstances.
Translated by Izabela Szymańska


The Medieval Millennium

This book includes biographical essays, chronologies, essays on society and culture, and maps. Frankforter's style is never intrusive and he manages to pull together disparate information on an extensive topic without losing his focus. Though not as flashy as the above textbooks, it nevertheless is extremely useful for the student or autodidact.


Watch the video: Η Ιστορία του Δυτικού Πολιτισμού 21 Η καθημερινή ζωή στον Μεσαίωνα


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