USS Barry (DD-2)

USS Barry (DD-2)


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USS Barry (DD-2)

USS Barry (DD-2) was a Bainbridge class destroyer that served in the Philippines before the First World War and then in the Mediterranean after the US entry into the war.

The Barry was launched on 22 March 1902 and commissioned on 24 November 1902. She was named after John Barry, who had commanded the Lexington and the Alliancein the Continental Navy and the United States in the young US Navy.

The Barry joined the 1st Torpedo Flotilla, part of the Coast Squadron in the North Atlantic Fleet, where she served alongside her sister ships. She took part in manoeuvres off the coast of New England in the summer of 1903, before the flotilla was posted to the Asiatic Station. The voyage east took five months, lasting from December 1903 to April 1904. This included a two week pause at Malta while repairs were carried out on a propeller damaged while the Barry was mooring.

The 1st Torpedo Flotilla served with the Battleship Squadron in the Far East. In most years she spent the winters in Philippine waters and the summer in Chinese waters, where the US fleet carried out a mix of drills and 'showing the flag' visits to Chinese ports.

This routine was disturbed on several occasions. Late in 1905 the Barry and the Bainbridge returned to Chinese waters in the winter as part of President Theodore Roosevelt's attempt to use a show of military force to end a Chinese boycott of American goods. On this occasion she was away from the Philippines for almost a year, and the two destroyers didn't return to the Philippines until October 1906. The Bainbridge was almost immediately taken out of commission for repairs to her boilers, and the Barry followed between 2 April and 21 December 1908. She was out of commission for a second time between 21 October 1912 and 24 June 1913, this time probably due to a lack of personnel.

On 1 August 1917 the Flotilla left the Philippines at the start of a voyage to Gibraltar, where it was to help escort Allied merchant ships in the increasingly dangerous waters of the Mediterranean. Once gain the voyage was disrupted by damage to one of the Barry's propellers, this time at Colombo, Ceylon. The flotilla reached Gibraltar on 20 October 1917, and the Barry spent the next nine months escorting merchant ships in the western Mediterranean and approaches, to protect them against German U-boats.

In August 1918 the Barry departed for Charleston, South Carolina. She spent the rest of 1918 carrying out patrol and escort duties off the US coast. She was decommissioned at Philadelphia on 28 June 1919 and sold for scrap on 3 January 1920.

Displacement (standard)

420 tons

Displacement (loaded)

620 tons

Top Speed

29kts

Engine

4 Thornycroft boilers
2 Vertical Triple Engines

Range

3000 miles at cruising speed

Length

250ft

Width

23ft 7in

Armaments

Two 3in/25 guns
Five 6pdr guns
Two 18in torpedo tubes

Crew complement

73

Launched

22 March 1920

Completed

24 November 1902

Fate

Sold 1920

Books on the First World War |Subject Index: First World War


USS Barry (DDG 52)

Propelled by powerful, quick response gas turbine (jet) engines to speeds in excess of 30 knots, USS BARRY is a diverse and extremely capable ARLEIGH BURKE - class AEGIS Guided Missile Destroyer. USS BARRY is the fourth ship in the Navy to bear the name. After being homeported in Norfolk, Va., for more than 25 years, the BARRY headed for Japan in January 2016. After a crew swap with USS LASSEN (DDG 82) at San Diego, Calif., she arrived at her new homeport Yokosuka, Japan, on March 14, 2016.

General Characteristics: Keel Laid: March 13, 1989
Launched: May 10, 1991
Commissioned: Dec 12, 1992
Builder: Ingalls Shipbuilding, West Bank, Pascagoula, Miss
Propulsion system: four General Electric LM 2500 gas turbine engines
Propellers: two
Blades on each Propeller: five
Length: 505,25 feet (154 meters)
Beam: 67 feet (20.4 meters)
Draft: 30,5 feet (9.3 meters)
Displacement: approx. 8.300 tons full load
Speed: 30+ knots
Aircraft: None. But LAMPS 3 electronics installed on landing deck for coordinated DDG/helicopter ASW operations.
Armament: two MK 41 VLS for Standard missiles, Tomahawk Harpoon missile launchers, one Mk 45 5-inch/54 caliber lightweight gun, two Phalanx CIWS, Mk 46 torpedoes (from two triple tube mounts), two Mk 38 Mod 2 25mm machine gun systems
Homeport: Yokosuka, Japan
Crew: 23 Officers, 24 Chief Petty Officers and 291 Enlisted

This section contains the names of sailors who served aboard USS BARRY. It is no official listing but contains the names of sailors who submitted their information.

About the Ship's Coat of Arms:

Red, white, and blue are our national colors. The field of bars, adapted from the BARRY coat of arms, is a reference to Captain John Barry for whom the ship is named. The stars recall the four battle stars awarded to the second BARRY in World War II, and represent all four ships to bear the name BARRY. The wavy pile represents the US Navy fleet in which Captain Barry held the first commission. The lion simbolizes courage and strength. Gold stands for excellence red and white for courage and integrity respectfully.

The frigate UNITED STATES symbolizes the unbroken tradition of patriotism, valor, fidelity, and ability from our Navy's beginning to the present, and represents the maritime imperative of our Country. It also honors the heritage of the three previous ships to bear the name BARRY. The stars and bars together symbolize the United States and refer further to Captain Barry's ship of that name.

BARRY, the fourth ship in the United States Navy named after Captain Barry, is the second in the ARLEIGH BURKE - class of AEGIS guided missile destroyers and the first built by Ingalls Shipbuilding of Pascagoula, Mississippi. Her construction began on March 13, 1989 she was launched on May 10, 1991, and christened on June 8, 1991 by her sponsor, Mrs. Rose Cochran, wife of United States Senator Thad Cochran. Assigned to the USS GEORGE WASHINGTON (CVN 73) Joint Task Group, BARRY's first operational deployment was to Haiti for Operation Support Democracy in 1994.

Later in 1994, BARRY commenced her first Mediterranean Sea deployment and returned to Norfolk, Va., in 1995.

USS BARRY's most recent Mediterranean Sea deployment was from February 2000 to August 2000. This time, the destroyer was part of the USS EISENHOWER (CVN 69) Battle Group.

Following the terrorist attacks in New York City and Washington, DC., on September 11, 2001, the commanding officer and the crew of USS BARRY requested the flag of the FDNY to be flown as battle ensign on their ship to commemorate the heroic work of the firemen in New York City.

About the Ship's Name, about Captain John Barry:

Born in County Wexford, Ireland, in 1745, John Barry was appointed a Captain in the Continental Navy December 7, 1775. He commanded LEXINGTON and ALLIANCE during the Revolutionary War. He was seriously wounded May 29, 1781, while in command of ALLIANCE during her capture of the British ships HMS ATLANTA and HMS TRESPASSY. Appointed Senior Captain upon the establishment of the US Navy subsequent to the ratification of the US Constitution in 1788, Captain Barry commanded the frigate UNITED STATES in the Quasi-War with France. Commodore Barry died on September 13, 1803, at Strawberry Hill near Philidelphia, PA. He was buried in St. Mary's Cemetery in Philidelphia, PA. Commodore Barry was honored by the United States Congress in 1906, when a statue was commissioned and later placed in Lafayette Park, Washington, D.C., and honored again some fifty years later when President Eisenhower ordered a statue of Commodore Barry to be presented on behalf of the people of the United States to the people of Ireland at County Wexford, Ireland. On August 21, 1981, President Ronald Reagan designated September 13, 1981 as Commodore John Barry Day, a tribute to one of the earliest and greatest American Patriots. Three other ships have been named in honor of this naval hero.


The photo below was taken by Karl-Heinz Ahles and shows USS BARRY at Naval Base Norfolk, Va, on May 11, 1999.

The photos below were taken by Brian Barton when USS BARRY was inport Norfolk, Va, on July 23, 2002. The ship in the background is the USS ARTHUR W. RADFORD (DD 968) leaving on its 2002 deployment to the Mediterranean and Arabian Gulf.

The photos below were taken by me and show the BARRY at Naval Base Norfolk, Va., on May 6, 2012.

The photos below were taken by Michael Jenning and show the BARRY at Naval Base Norfolk, Va., on April 29, 2015.

The photos below were taken by Michael Jenning and show the BARRY at Naval Base Norfolk, Va., on October 6, 2015.

The photos below were taken by Steven Collingwood and show the BARRY leaving Naval Base Norfolk, Va., for the long journey to her new homeport of Yokosuka, Japan, on January 12, 2016. BARRY arrived at Yokosuka on March 14, 2016.

The photos below were taken by Michael Jenning and show the BARRY at Yokosuka, Japan, on August 3, 2019.


USS Barry (DD-2) - History

USS Barry , a 420-ton Bainbridge class destroyer, was built at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She was commissioned in late November 1902 and served for the next year with the North Atlantic Fleet. With four of her sister destroyers, Barry steamed across the Atlantic, transited the Mediterranean and the Suez Canal and crossed the Indian Ocean and the South China Sea between December 1903 and April 1904. For the next thirteen years she served in the Far East, operating off China and in the Philippine Islands.

In August 1917, some months after the United States entered World War I, Barry retraced her route to reinforce the anti-submarine effort in European waters. After nearly a year of convoy escort and patrol service in the vicinity of Gibraltar, she returned to the United States and was based at Charleston, South Carolina until after the November 1918 Armistice. Barry was stationed at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from January 1919 until she decommissioned in late June. She was sold at the beginning of 1920.

USS Barry was named in honor of Commodore John Barry (1745-1803), one of the most important leaders of the early United States Navy.

This page features all the views we have related to USS Barry (Destroyer # 2).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Photographed in port soon after completion, circa 1902-1903.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 95KB 740 x 575 pixels

Alongside the Sheer Wharf at Cavite Navy Yard, Philippines, circa 1910-1913.

Collection of Phillip H. Wilson. Donated by Mrs. Pauline M. Wilson, 1979.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 111KB 740 x 460 pixels

Coaling at the Cavite Navy Yard, Philippine Islands, circa 1912.

Collection of Phillip H. Wilson.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 82KB 440 x 765 pixels

At the Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina, circa late 1918.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 85KB 740 x 605 pixels

"First Torpedo Flotilla. During a Storm in the Mediterranean en-route to China February 23, 1904"

Painting by an unidentified artist, depicting the destroyers Bainbridge , Barry , Chauncey , Dale and Decatur in heavy seas.

Courtesy of the U.S. Navy Art Collection, Washington, D.C. Donation of Mrs. Anne Garagusi, 1981.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 92KB 740 x 530 pixels

Steaming in close formation off Chefoo, China, in 1905, while under the command of Lieutenant Dudley W. Knox. Ships present are (as numbered):
1. USS Decatur (Destroyer # 5)
2. USS Dale (Destroyer # 4)
3. USS Barry (Destroyer # 2)
4. USS Chauncey (Destroyer # 3) and
5. USS Bainbridge (Destroyer # 1).

Donation of Mrs. J.R. Kean, 1938. Courtesy of Captain Dudley W. Knox, USN (Retired).

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 95KB 740 x 600 pixels

Forming a "wedge" formation while steaming off Chefoo, China, during the summer of 1905. Photographed from USS Dale (Destroyer # 4). The other ships present are (as numbered):
1. USS Decatur (Destroyer # 5)
2. USS Barry (Destroyer # 2)
3. USS Chauncey (Destroyer # 3) and
4. USS Bainbridge (Destroyer # 1).
The Flotilla was commanded by Lieutenant Dudley W. Knox.

Donation of Mrs. J.R. Kean, 1938. Courtesy of Captain Dudley W. Knox, USN (Retired).

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 78KB 560 x 765pixels

USS Chauncey (Destroyer # 3)
and
USS Barry (Destroyer # 2)

Anchored in Philippine waters, circa 1914-1916.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 60KB 740 x 505 pixels

Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania

Destroyers awaiting decommissioning in the Navy Yard's Reserve Basin, during the Spring of 1919. Photographed by La Tour.
Ships present are identified in Photo # NH 43036 (complete caption).

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 80KB 740 x 500 pixels

Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania

Old destroyers in the Reserve Basin, 13 June 1919, while awaiting decommissioning. Note the truck and liferafts on the pier.
These ships are (from left to right):
USS Worden (Destroyer # 16)
USS Barry (Destroyer # 2)
USS Hull (Destroyer # 7)
USS Hopkins (Destroyer # 6) -- probably
USS Bainbridge (Destroyer # 1)
USS Stewart (Destroyer # 13)
USS Paul Jones (Destroyer # 10) and
USS Decatur (Destroyer # 5).
Ships further to the right can not be identified.

Courtesy of Frank Jankowski, 1981.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 117KB 740 x 595 pixels

Group photograph of most of the Flotilla's officers, on board USS Chauncey (Destroyer # 3). Taken at the Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia, in late 1903, shortly before the Flotilla left for its voyage to the Philippines. Those present are identified in Photo # NH 54148 (complete caption).

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 72KB 740 x 465 pixels

The following photograph shows a ship that MAY be USS Barry (Destroyer # 2):


Sadržaj/Садржај

Kobilica je položena 2. rujna 1899. u brodogradilištu Builder, Neafie & Levy u Philadelphiji. Porinut je 22. ožujka 1902. i u operativnu uporabu primljen je 24. studenog 1902.

Operativna uporaba Uredi

O uvođenja u službu pa do 1903. služio je u sastavu Sjeverno Atlantske Flote. Zajedno s četiri sestrinska broda u razdoblju od prosinca 1903. do travnja 1904. preplovio je Atlantski ocean, Sredozemno more, prošao kroz Sueski kanal, ušao u Indijski ocean te naposljetku u Južno kinesko more. Sljedećih trinaest godina služio je na dalekom istoku djelujući uz obalu Kine i Filipinskih otoka. [1]

Istom rutom vraća se u kolovozu 1917. kako bi pomogao u borbi protiv podmornica u europskim vodama. Nakon gotovo godinu dana eskorta konvoja i ophodnje u blizini Gibraltara, vraća se u SAD i bazira u Charlestonu. Od siječnja 1919. do povlačenja iz službe u lipnju iste godine nalazi se u Philadelphiji. [1]


Barry was held in reserve commission until 15 November 1921 when she was placed in full commission and reported to the Atlantic Fleet. In October 1922 she departed Hampton Roads, Va., for the Mediterranean where she served with the US Naval Detachment in Turkish Waters until July 1923. Returning to the east coast 10 August 1923 she joined Destroyer Squadron 14, Scouting Fleet. Later in August and in September, Barry operated on &ldquoplane guard&rdquo in the Atlantic for the US Army&rsquos &ldquoAround the World Flight&rdquo and was stationed between Labrador and Nova Scotia, Canada. When one of the three Army planes ditched owing to engine trouble, Barry transported the pilots to Pictou, Nova Scotia, where they boarded a replacement plane to continue their flight home to Seattle via Boston and across the United States.

Early in 1925 Barry transited the Panama Canal and joined the Battle Fleet for maneuvers in the Pacific. She returned to the east coast in July 1925 and took up routine duties with the scouting Fleet until February 1932, when she returned to the Pacific for fleet maneuvers. Upon completion of maneuvers she returned to the Atlantic and was assigned to Rotating Reserve Destroyer Squadron 19 at Norfolk, 20 December 1932.

Barry was recommissioned at Norfolk 20 June 1933 and on 1 July sailed for San Diego to Join Destroyer Division 7, Scouting Force. She served with the Scouting Force until May 1936 when she returned to the Atlantic and for a short time served as flagship of Destroyer Division 8. Later in 1936 she again returned to the Pacific, joining Destroyer Division 22, Battle Force. Between January and April 1938 she was in Hawaiian waters and on 21 May 1938 was transferred to Destroyer Division 21, in the Atlantic.

Barry joined Destroyer Division 67 in the Canal Zone 18 October 1940. Still on duty there when the United States entered World War II, she was assigned escort and anti-submarine warfare missions against the German submarine menace in the Atlantic. Early in 1942 Barry operated in the Caribbean escorting convoys between Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, and Panama and Curaçao and Trinidad. Later in the year and throughout the first half of 1943 she performed escort duties in the South Atlantic, operating from Trinidad. Between July and November 1943 she served as a unit of TG 21.14, a hunter-killer group which operated along the North Atlantic convoy lanes. The group conducted two sweeps (30 July&ndash10 September and 28 September&ndash8 November) during which aircraft from Card (CVE-11) sank eight German submarines. Barry and Goff (DD-247) rescued survivors of Borie (DD-215) after she was mortally damaged 1 November while sinking the German submarine U-405.

Barry underwent conversion to a high-speed transport at Charleston Navy Yard, 31 December 1943-17 February 1944 (reclassified APD-29, 15 January 1944). Barry departed the east coast 13 April 1844 for Mers-el-Kébir, Algeria, arriving 30 April. Practice amphibious landings were carried out until 14 August when she sortied for the invasion of southern France.

Between 15 and 20 August 1944 she landed her troops on the Islands of Levant and Port Cros, as well as on the mainland of France. Between August and December Barry served on escort duty in the western Mediterranean and then returned to the United States, arriving at Norfolk 23 December 1944. After brief repairs Barry departed for the Pacific and arrived at Pearl Harbor 24 March 1945. After training in the Hawaiian Islands, she arrived off Okinawa 16 May and performed patrol and escort duties during the occupation of the island.

On 25 May she was attacked by two kamikazes while on patrol 35 miles northwest of Okinawa. One was shot down, but the other broke through the barrage and struck Barry below her bridge. Twenty-eight of her valiant crew were wounded by shrapnel. The explosion of the plane&rsquos gasoline tanks and bomb ignited fuel oil escaping from Barry&rsquos ruptured tanks. The fire threatened the forward magazine which could not be reached to flood. At 1340, 40 minutes after the plane struck, the commanding officer gave the order to abandon ship. Barry&rsquos boats were lowered and all hands safely cleared the side.

At 1500 the water had risen until the forward magazine was covered, minimizing the danger of explosion. A skeleton crew, together with parties from Sims (APD-50) and Roper (APD-20), then reboarded Barry and the last fires were extinguished at 0630 the next day.

Barry was towed to the anchorage at Kerama Retto 28 May and found too extensively damaged to warrant repair or salvage. Stripped of useful gear, she was decommissioned 21 June 1945. Later in the day she was towed from the harbor of Kerama Retto to be used as a decoy for the kamikazes. While under tow she was attacked by Japanese suicide planes and sunk along with her escort, LSM-59.

In addition to the Presidential Unit Citation as a unit of TG 21.14, Barry earned four battle stars in World War II, three on her European/African/Middle Eastern campaign ribbon and one on her Asiatic-Pacific campaign ribbon for participation in the following operations:


USS Barry (DD 933)

Commissioned as the third FORREST SHERMAN - class destroyer, the USS BARRY was the third ship in the Navy to bear the name. In the mid-1960s, BARRY was one of the eight FORREST SHERMAN - class destroyers chosen to receive an anti-submarine warfare capability upgrade which included the replacement of one of the Mk-42 5-inch guns with a Mk-16 ASROC missile launcher. The ships that underwent the conversion then formed the BARRY - class.

USS BARRY was decommissioned after more than 26 years of service on November 5, 1982. She was stricken from the Navy list on January 31, 1983, and was subsequently opened as a display ship at the Washington Navy Yard, Washington, DC, in 1984. Click here for a photo tour of the BARRY at the Washington Navy Yard.

In October 2015, the construction for a new bridge designed to replace the existing Frederick Douglass Memorial Bridge started. The old bridge - a swing bridge - allowed BARRY to be towed out while the new bridge - a fixed-span bridge - would trap the BARRY on the Anacostia River. This, as well as the fact that the BARRY was in need of $2,000,000 in repairs led the Navy to decide to remove the ship and sell it for scrapping. On May 7, 2016, the BARRY left Washington under tow for the former Philadelphia Naval Shipyard where she is now waiting for her sale.

General Characteristics: Awarded: December 15, 1952
Keel laid: March 15, 1954
Launched: October 1, 1955
Commissioned: July 9, 1956
Decommissioned: November 5, 1982
Builder: Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine
Propulsion system: four-1200 lb. boilers two steam turbines two shafts
Propellers: two
Length: 413 feet (125.9 meters)
Beam: 45,3 feet (13.8 meters)
Draft: 22 feet (6.7 meters)
Displacement: approx. 4,000 tons full load
Speed: 32+ knots
Aircraft: none
Armament: two Mk-42 5-inch/54 caliber guns, Mk-32 ASW torpedo tubes (two triple mounts), one Mk-16 ASROC missile launcher
Crew: 17 officers, 287 enlisted

This section contains the names of sailors who served aboard USS BARRY. It is no official listing but contains the names of sailors who submitted their information.

Accidents aboard USS BARRY:

Born in County Wexford, Ireland, in 1745, John Barry was appointed a Captain in the Continental Navy December 7, 1775. He commanded LEXINGTON and ALLIANCE during the Revolutionary War. He was seriously wounded May 29, 1781, while in command of ALLIANCE during her capture of the British ships HMS ATLANTA and HMS TRESPASSY. Appointed Senior Captain upon the establishment of the US Navy subsequent to the ratification of the US Constitution in 1788, Captain Barry commanded the frigate UNITED STATES in the Quasi-War with France. Commodore Barry died on September 13, 1803, at Strawberry Hill near Philidelphia, PA. He was buried in St. Mary's Cemetery in Philidelphia, PA. Commodore Barry was honored by the United States Congress in 1906, when a statue was commissioned and later placed in Lafayette Park, Washington, D.C., and honored again some fifty years later when President Eisenhower ordered a statue of Commodore Barry to be presented on behalf of the people of the United States to the people of Ireland at County Wexford, Ireland. On August 21, 1981, President Ronald Reagan designated September 13, 1981 as Commodore John Barry Day, a tribute to one of the earliest and greatest American Patriots. Three other ships have been named in honor of this naval hero.

USS BARRY was built at Bath, Maine. She was commissioned in September 1956 and early the next year made her shakedown cruise to the Caribbean area and the west coast of South America. In mid-1957 BARRY operated with the Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean Sea, the first of some eight deployments to that often troubled part of the World. While on a second such cruise in June-September 1958 she supported carrier operations during the Lebanon crisis. Later in 1958 and into 1959, the destroyer was fitted with a large SQS-23 sonar, giving her a distinctive "clipper" bow profile that she has carried ever since. She spent the next few years participating in sonar tests and demonstrations, plus anti-submarine warfare (ASW) exercises, in the western Atlantic and in Northern European waters.

BARRY returned to the Mediterranean in June-August 1962 as part of an ASW task group and that fall took part in Cuban Missile Crisis operations. She revisited Northern Europe and the Mediterranean in 1964. During late 1965 and the first months of 1966, she conducted her only Pacific deployment, which included Vietnam War combat duty. This "round the World" cruise featured transit of the Panama Canal outbound and the Suez Canal while steaming homeward. Late in 1966, BARRY served as test ship for the Mark 86 fire control system, then entered the shipyard for a two-year-long modernization that significantly altered her appearance and greatly enhanced her ASW capabilities.

Recommissioned in April 1968, BARRY made her next overseas voyage, to Northern Europe, during August-December 1969 and conducted a brief Mediterranean cruise in October 1970. Between August 1972 and July 1975 she was homeported in Greece. In addition to conducting NATO exercises and anti-submarine operations, she was also present during the 1973 Middle Eastern war and the 1974 Cyprus crisis. Another Sixth Fleet deployment took place in 1977-1978, followed by a cruise through the Baltic Sea that took her as far east as Finland.

During her final Sixth Fleet tour, in March-September 1979, BARRY passed through the Suez Canal to join the Middle East Force for Persian Gulf service during the very tense period that accompanied the Iranian Revolution. A second deployment to those distant waters, which were becoming increasingly familiar to U.S. Sailors, took place in 1981-1982. In November 1982, shortly after the end of that cruise, USS BARRY was decommissioned. Stricken from the Naval Vessel Register in January 1983, the ship was towed to the Washington, D.C., in the fall of that year. Moored at the historic Washington Navy Yard, she has since served as the Navy's display ship in the Nation's Capital.

DateWhereEvents
September 27, 1963Newport, Rhode Island
USS Barry after her ASW conversion

The photos below were taken by me on November 8, 2008, during a visit to the USS BARRY museum at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington, DC. Unfortunately, during my visit there was a ceremony aboard the BARRY and not all areas of the ship were accessable.

Click here to view more photos.

The photos below were taken by Michael Jenning and show the BARRY laid up at the former Philadelphia Naval Shipyard on October 17, 2016.


Destroyer USS Barry, DD-933

The Destroyer USS Barry is a Forrest Sherman Class Destroyer.

DD-933's specifications are:

Length: 418 feet 5 inches
Beam: 45 feet
Draught: 19 feet 6 inches
Crew: 335
Displacement: 4,050 tons
Max Speed: 33 knots (38mph)
Fuel Capacity: 665 tons of fuel oil
Range: 4,500 nautical miles
Original Armament:
Three 5 inch 54 cal.in 3 gun turrets
Two 3 inch 50 cal dual mounts
Two Mk 11 Hedgehog Anti Submarine mortar launchers
Four 21 inch Mk 25 Torpedo Tubes
Current Armament:
Two 5 inch 54 cal. turrets
Two triple 12.75" anti submarine Mk 32 torpedo tubes
ASROC Anti Submarine Rocket launcher system
Power Plant: 4 oil fired boilers powering 2 General Electric steam turbines driving 2 screws with 70,000 Shaft Horsepower
Launching Date: March 15, 1954 at the Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine

You can visit the USS Barry DD-933 at the US Navy Museum in Washington, DC. As the museum ship USS Barry is located on a US naval base there is more security involved in visiting this than other museums. The museum asks that you call for an appointment for a visit by noon the day prior and you must have a valid photo ID driver's licence or passport. Visitors arriving in private vehicles must also provide vehicle registration and insurance card. You'll be issued a pass which you should keep with you as if you turn down a wrong street as I did you may be stopped and have your pass, ID, and bag checked by security. The good news is that admission is free, crowds are thin (No one that I met socially during my visit to DC knew about the destroyer), and there is an excellent commissary with a choice of chain food vendors in a restored factory building. It's a great place to spend a day in DC.

DD-933 is in excellent condition and most of the equipment seems to be in place. The bridge and Combat Information Center are readily accessible and in great shape. Although it takes a few minutes to get used to, the lighting in the CIC is pretty neat. Some rooms and areas are partitioned with plexiglas, but it is kept very clean and the exhibits are easy to see. The naval seamen aboard the USS Barry were friendly and eager to answer your questions, and other staff were busy doing restoration work. The damage control equipment displays were nicely laid out and labeled well.

October 2010 - the USS Barry is featured in an episode (Short Fuse) of the TV series NCIS. I didn't recognize the interior compartments used for filming so I don't know if they actually did any shooting there, but it was fun to see the destroyer woven into an episode.

Since I first created this page the USS Barry has popped up in most NCIS episodes. Often external wide night shots of the naval base show the Destroyer lit up with strings of lights. Also in interior shots of the building DD-933 is the ship visible through the windows in the background.


Obsah

Loď byla stavěna loděnicí Neafie and Levy Ship and Engine Building Company ve Filadelfii. Spuštěna na vodu byla 22. března 1902, její patronkou se stala Charlotte Adamsová Barnesová, prapraneteř komodora Barryho. Dne 24. listopadu 1902 byla uvedena do služby pod velením poručíka Nobleho Edwarda Irwina.

Před první světovou válkou Editovat

Barry byl přiřazen k 1. torpédové flotile u Severoatlantického loďstva. Během léta 1903 se zúčastnil manévrů u pobřeží Nové Anglie. V prosinci 1903 opustil východní pobřeží a skrze Suezský průplav doplul v dubnu 1904 na Filipíny, kde se přiradil k Asijské eskadře. Zde sloužil až do srpna 1917, vyjma dvou krátkých období mimo službu (2. dubna až 21. prosince 1908 a 21. října 1912 až 24. června 1913).

První světová válka Editovat

Po vstupu Spojených států amerických do první světové války opustil Barry 1. srpna 1917 Filipíny a skrze Suez doplul 20. října do Gibraltaru. Zde se podílel na doprovodu obchodních lodích ve Středomoří až do srpna 1918. Poté odplul zpět do USA, do Charlestonu, kam dorazil 5. září. V Charlestonu zůstal do konce roku, podílel se na hlídkové a konvojové službě. V lednu 1919 odplil do Filadelfské námořní loděnice, kde byl 28. června vyřazen ze služby a následně 3. ledna 1920 prodán Josephu G. Hitnerovi k sešrotování.

V tomto článku byl použit překlad textu z článku USS Barry (DD-2) na anglické Wikipedii.


Washington Navy Yard to Dismantle Display Ship Barry By Next Summer, No Plans for Replacement

The Navy will remove the display ship Barry from Washington Navy Yard by next summer to avoid the ship becoming landlocked, and for now there are no plans to replace the decommissioned destroyer with another platform to draw visitors, the commanding officer of Naval Support Activity Washington told USNI News.

The former-USS Barry (DD-933) has been docked at Navy Yard since May 1983 and has not been to a dry dock for maintenance since its 1982 decommissioning, Capt. Monte Ulmer said Wednesday. The ship’s hull was proven structurally sound in a hull survey conducted last year, but after sitting in the Anacostia River for so many decades without work, “there are some deteriorations to the hull” that would eventually need repair.

Starting next summer, though, that would be nearly impossible to do. Washington, D.C., officials are getting set to begin construction on a new Frederick Douglass Memorial Bridge to cross the river, and this one will be a fixed-span bridge instead of a drawbridge – and there will only be 50 feet between the top of the water and the bottom of the bridge.

Barry, standing about 150 feet tall, “would not be able to get … underneath the bridge without doing some major dismantling, so to speak, here on this side of the river. So that kind of drove it to where once the bridge is in place, that landlocks the Barry and would make it very difficult to dispose of later or to move it to another location at a later date,” Ulmer said.

The captain said the city will begin work on the bridge this fall, and by the summer of 2016 it will be impossible to get taller ships into or out of the Navy Yard piers.

The Navy has not yet made a decision about replacing Barry with another decommissioned ship, and there is no timeline for doing so, Ulmer said. However, if the Navy waits until after next summer to make a decision, it would be limited to smaller ships that could fit under the new bridge without needing any costly work to disassemble and then reassemble the ship.

The next step in the process is for Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA), with support from the Defense Logistics Agency, to solicit and award a sales contract to tow away and dismantle Barry, Ulmer said. So for now, there are no details yet about when or where the ship would be taken apart.

The last time a display ship had to be towed from its pier, the Navy encountered difficulties — in 2006 the museum ship Intrepid (CV-11) in New York was found stuck in the mud of the Hudson River when the ship needed to be moved for repairs. Freeing the decommissioned Essex-class carrier required an extensive engineering effort. In this case, however, NSA Washington spokesman Brian Sutton said that “we conducted a hull survey in July 2014 and it was determined that the ship is floating with room to spare underneath. The divers were able to swim under the hull for the entire length of the ship.”

Apart from the decision to get rid of the display ship, NSA Washington is demolishing two of its four piers and reconditioning Pier 2, where Barry currently sits. Ulmer said planning for that project began three to five years ago, and the Pier 2 work will continue even though DS Barry will be leaving and therefore there will be less foot traffic. The display ship saw about 9,000 visitors last year, Ulmer said.


Watch the video: USS Barry DD-933


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